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Thyme and Thyme again. . .

Time and time again, one of the most versatile and widely used herb by humans has been, and still is thyme. This small, low-growing shrub with its curled leaves has been used by the Ancient Egyptians for embalming purposes, the Ancient Greeks used it in their baths, and for burning incense, and when the Romans came in to power, it was believed that they were responsible for spreading this wonderful herb throughout Europe; and the many applications for the wondrous herb has never stopped.

During the middle ages thyme was placed underneath pillows to induce sleep and stave off nightmares. I guess this method is a lot more effective than trying to count sheep at night. Also during this era, the women offered knights and warriors gifts that included thyme leaves, as it was believed to imbue its bearer with tremendous courage.

Of course my love of thyme is for its pungent, minty- lemon like fragrance and flavor. This multi-purpose herb matches well with chicken, beef, lamb, pork, game, fish, figs, carrots, goats cheese, lentils, onions, peas, potatoes, and tomatoes. It is excellent in soups and tomato based sauces, and equally good with delicate seafood dishes or hearty soups and stews, and let's not forget about those sassy sausage gumbos.

You can buy fresh thyme that is sold in bunches of sprigs, or as a dried herb which is perfectly acceptable to substitute for whole thyme in all your cooking needs. Thyme is also one of the essential ingredients in bouquet garni, and in Herbes de Provence.

Even though weve come a long way from embalming methods, and gifts of courage, thyme is still used in many of the ancient ways that include aromatic & essential oils which has antiseptic and anesthetic properties, and is also used in toothpastes, incense and topical salves.

You can choose what you want to do with your thyme, but if you want to make a deliciously light meal, please try our Israeli Couscous & Mushroom recipe, and take time to enjoy the fresh spring weather.

Israeli Couscous& Mushroom- click link